Gold Doylestown Glass Ball Club BroochGold Doylestown Glass Ball Club BroochGold Doylestown Glass Ball Club BroochGold Doylestown Glass Ball Club BroochGold Doylestown Glass Ball Club BroochGold Doylestown Glass Ball Club BroochGold Doylestown Glass Ball Club Brooch
Gold Doylestown Glass Ball Club Brooch
Gold Doylestown Glass Ball Club Brooch
Gold Doylestown Glass Ball Club Brooch
Gold Doylestown Glass Ball Club Brooch
Gold Doylestown Glass Ball Club Brooch
Gold Doylestown Glass Ball Club Brooch
Gold Doylestown Glass Ball Club Brooch

Story

The world of antique jewelry and personal adornment can never be considered never dull. One never knows what will turn up.

Today none of us can imagine receiving gold and sterling silver awards for seemingly everyday events. But not so long ago, it was a common practice.

The mysterious, Doylestown Glass Ball Club presented this 10k rose gold award.

The top is hand engraved, "Champion Badge". The shield shaped section suspended from chain, "Doylestown Glass Ball Club" and "Presented by Tho. s (for Thomas) L. Golcher and Phila (Phildelphia)".

Also, two crossed shots guns are hand engraved to the surface, as well as a border design.

Naturally, an amber colored glass ball is suspended at the bottom.

From our research, very little is mentioned about the Glass Ball Club, but it appears to have been a shooting club similar to aiming for clay pigeons, but in this case, for glass orbs! Any information is always welcome.

Note: There is a Thomas L. Golcher who made gun locks in the 19th century who hailed from Philadelphia so likely the same. His family all produced gun lockets as well.

Gold Doylestown Glass Ball Club BroochGold Doylestown Glass Ball Club BroochGold Doylestown Glass Ball Club BroochGold Doylestown Glass Ball Club BroochGold Doylestown Glass Ball Club BroochGold Doylestown Glass Ball Club BroochGold Doylestown Glass Ball Club Brooch
Item 21118

Gold Doylestown Glass Ball Club Brooch

Only One Available

$895 USD
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Date: Circa 1880.

Measurements: Length of 2 5/8 inches and width at widest of 1 7/16 inches. Weight of 7.6 grams.

Condition: Excellent, "C" clasp reinforced at the base. Pin stem is not gold.

Origin: American.

Story

The world of antique jewelry and personal adornment can never be considered never dull. One never knows what will turn up.

Today none of us can imagine receiving gold and sterling silver awards for seemingly everyday events. But not so long ago, it was a common practice.

The mysterious, Doylestown Glass Ball Club presented this 10k rose gold award.

The top is hand engraved, "Champion Badge". The shield shaped section suspended from chain, "Doylestown Glass Ball Club" and "Presented by Tho. s (for Thomas) L. Golcher and Phila (Phildelphia)".

Also, two crossed shots guns are hand engraved to the surface, as well as a border design.

Naturally, an amber colored glass ball is suspended at the bottom.

From our research, very little is mentioned about the Glass Ball Club, but it appears to have been a shooting club similar to aiming for clay pigeons, but in this case, for glass orbs! Any information is always welcome.

Note: There is a Thomas L. Golcher who made gun locks in the 19th century who hailed from Philadelphia so likely the same. His family all produced gun lockets as well.