Georgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold EarringsGeorgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold EarringsGeorgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold EarringsGeorgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold EarringsGeorgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold Earrings
Georgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold Earrings
Georgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold Earrings
Georgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold Earrings
Georgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold Earrings
Georgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold Earrings

Story

The traditional girandole, a quintessential 18th century form of jewelry, consisted of a five element design. The surmount suspends a ribbon or bow-shaped section, which in turn supports three drops.

A number of variations on this theme existed ranging from wider and shorter types, longer, and thinner, those with even sized dangles, or ones with one larger and two smaller drops.

In this magnificent example, each earring showcases nine antique diamonds, a mix of modified table cuts and rose cuts. All the diamonds are set into high conical domes of gold with the edges rubbed over the stones.

The central stylized bow form is lyrical with its structure giving a sense of foliage with tendrils and vine-like scrolls. The reverse reveals both thinner gold elements as well as rounded and closed backed forms. Each part varies ever so slightly as these are completely handmade. Please note the back to front ear wires as is typical of the time period.

Note: Please refer to page 61 in “Earrings: From Antiquity to the Present” by Mascetti and Triossi and page 63 for an almost exact example.

Georgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold EarringsGeorgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold EarringsGeorgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold EarringsGeorgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold EarringsGeorgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold Earrings
Item 20542

Georgian Early Spanish Diamond & Gold Earrings

Only One Available

SOLD
Own It!Payments, Credit & LayawaysGuarantee & Authenticity

THE HOLIDAYS ARE ON!

ORDER BY DEC. 21ST FOR XMAS FOR MOST ITEMS!

HOLIDAY EXTENDED RETURNS TILL DEC. 31ST.

SHIPPING

FREE INSURED SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!

Same day shipping. Order by 1 pm CT, M-F for most

Free – 2 day delivery, fully insured

More info at Shipping

TESTING

Gemologist on staff

Full gemological laboratory on site

All gemstones and diamonds are thoroughly tested

All precious metals are tested

THE FINE PRINT

Due to the nature of antique & vintage jewelry, many diamond and gemstone weights are calculated by measurements, not removed. Actual weights are noted in the item's description. Grading of diamonds and gemstones may vary slightly when removed.

HONESTY

Being as honest as possible about the items we represent for sale is our ultimate goal! Our pricing is industry recognized as fair and equitable with value as the byword.


Date: Circa 1780.

Measurements: Length of 2 5/16 inches and 1 1/4 inches wide at the widest. Weight of 14.1 grams.

Condition: Excellent, ear wires replaced, a few diamonds with edge or facet wear visible with powerful magnification.

Hallmarks: Unidentified marks.

Origin: Iberian, Spanish or Portuguese.

Story

The traditional girandole, a quintessential 18th century form of jewelry, consisted of a five element design. The surmount suspends a ribbon or bow-shaped section, which in turn supports three drops.

A number of variations on this theme existed ranging from wider and shorter types, longer, and thinner, those with even sized dangles, or ones with one larger and two smaller drops.

In this magnificent example, each earring showcases nine antique diamonds, a mix of modified table cuts and rose cuts. All the diamonds are set into high conical domes of gold with the edges rubbed over the stones.

The central stylized bow form is lyrical with its structure giving a sense of foliage with tendrils and vine-like scrolls. The reverse reveals both thinner gold elements as well as rounded and closed backed forms. Each part varies ever so slightly as these are completely handmade. Please note the back to front ear wires as is typical of the time period.

Note: Please refer to page 61 in “Earrings: From Antiquity to the Present” by Mascetti and Triossi and page 63 for an almost exact example.